Beers of the World is written by the leading beer writers of our time, and will cover all the beers of the world - ale and lager, from the UK and Germany, the Czech Republic, US and beyond.

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Welcome back () Sunday 11th January 2009 - 7:28 PM GMT

Beers of the World Issue 7

Published on 28/07/2006

Beer Tastings

A truly fruity, golden ale that will happily outlast En.....

A well-balanced if not very exciting strong lager from .....

A pleasant, clean, very lightdrinking bitter with an in.....

Sadly, it all goes downhill after the aroma, with oxida.....

Disappointing. Strongarm is a lovely beer on draught, w.....

Regrettably, like the other Camerons beers, ruined by o.....

A red bottle-conditioned ale that drinks just a little .....

An enjoyable bottle-conditioned porter that, on this ta.....

A pleasant enough and interesting progression from the .....

A powerful beer giving the impression of being just a b.....

A quaffing beer that, thankfully, is not too much in th.....

A well-balanced, tasty, dark golden ale with an enjoyab.....

An unusual but well-judged beer with intriguing but not.....

An impressive beer from first sight – in its corked Cha.....

An exceptionally good, authentic, deep-ruby porter, bot.....

An enjoyable, clean-tasting, hoppy lager. The brewery –.....

An amber-red bitter, one of a range of bottle-condition.....

It could be a touch cleaner, perhaps, but this golden l.....

An unusual porter – there are no coffee or pronounced c.....

A Russian lager with unusual flavours, but lacking fine.....

A full-bodied, sweetish, pale golden lager with a decen.....

Contents

p5

Dominic Roskrow dons the Editor’s hat for the last time and looks at his baby’s first year in existence

This is my last issue as Editor of Beers of the World and as of issue eight, Sally Toms will be at the helm. I’ll still be consultant editor to the title and will be writing regularly for it, but I m...

By Dominic Roskrow in the section From the Editor

p7

When you hear the sound of brass, take the trolley

Here’s a test of your beer knowledge. Which city in the world has the most breweries? Do you know? Or (supposing it were a question in your pub quiz), which city would you guess? Pilsen, Munich, Dort...

By in the section

p16

There is more to beer than bubbles and alcohol, as Alastair Gilmour discovered when he headed to Switzerland for a beer massage...

The water in the whirlpool bath is hot; there’s a metre of snow outside; you’re completely naked, but you’re perfectly relaxed and utterly content, so what is the Swiss spa masseuse about to do with h...

By Alastair Gilmour in the section

p20

It might not be widely recognised, but Carlsberg is a progressive and innovative company, and that’s because of its founder, Jacob Christian Jacobsen. Glynn Davis reports

To most beer drinkers who live outside Denmark the name Carlsberg conjures up only one thing – the famous green-labelled lager. It is this pilsener-style brew that is ubiquitous in drinking establishm...

By Glynn Davis in the section Spotlight

p22

Liverpool brewery Cains seemed to be going nowhere fast until two brothers turned it on its head. Andrew Catchpole reports

When two Asian brothers of Kentish origin bought the loss-making Cains brewery in Liverpool in 2002 more than a few eyebrows were raised. With no experience of brewing, no local ties, a background in...

By Andrew Catchpole in the section Brewery Focus

p26

Although the big brewers still dominate, new regional brewers are springing up all the time, reports Andrew Burnyeat

The growing popularity of beer and football is spreading peace and harmony across the world. Not since fish and chips have two cultural pillars so perfectly complemented one another. At the recent W...

By in the section International Focus

p30

The Ring o’ Bells Brewery in Launceston was born almost by default. Nigel Huddleston reports on how it’s now flourishing

When Adrian Carter and his family moved from the north of England to Cornwall in the south west retirement was the thing uppermost on his mind. The family settled into a cottage called Ring o’ Bells...

By Nigel Huddleston in the section Spotlight

p32

In the latest in our series Nigel Huddleston considers grains other than barley that can be used in beer

Lest we should start mired in confusion, what we’re talking about here is the raw ingredients that provide the nuances of some of the world’s great beers (and some of the less-acclaimed ones) rather t...

By Nigel Huddleston in the section

p34

England's West Midlands has long been a beer heartland, built on its industrial past. Roger Protz looks at what is on offer these days

Mild ale was once the dominant beer style of England but it declined after World War Two under the twin onslaughts of first bitter and then lager. It has nevertheless retained a substantial following ...

By Roger Protz in the section Regional Focus

p38

Each issue we’ll feature some of the stranger and funnier stories as well as all sorts of other nonsense in association with the Little Beer Company

Beer history If you thought heavy handed Government legislation, streets awash with drunken people and drinking binges were just a thing of modern times, then think again. A new exhibition running ...

By Dominic Roskrow in the section Beer Matters

p40

Where in London can you eat good food and drink great beer at the same time? Ben McFarland found out

Decent drinking establishments that serve a good pint are twoa- penny in London and there are certainly plenty of places where you can get a good and tasty feed (the capital no longer plays second fid...

By Ben McFarland in the section Beer and Food

p43

Jim Helsby worked as a pathology technician in a local hospital before his passion for beer got the better of him. Richard Jones finds his York Wine and Beer Shop in rude health

It’s probably best not to know what happens to your bloodstream after a healthy (unhealthy?) session of beer drinking, but Jim Helsby probably has more idea than most. Jim worked in the pathology lab...

By Richard Jones in the section Spotlight

p44

Does it make any difference to taste if a beer is brewed under licence in a country rather than imported? Nigel Huddleston finds out

What do the five best-selling beer brands in the United Kingdom have in common? Well, no surprise that they are all lagers, but more than that, they’re all beers that started out as overseas brands t...

By Nigel Huddleston in the section

p48

Pierre Celis is the king of Belgian wheat beer. John White reports

Eighty-one year old Pierre Celis, the founder of the Hoegaarden Brewery, is the King of Belgian wheat beer (white beer, witbier, bière blanche). He is a true giant of the Belgian beer world. If asked...

By in the section

p50

Dublin is established as a beer drinkers' paradise. But now the money's rolling in and the city's being transformed, where can you still get a decent pint? Andrew Marshall reports

Little has changed since Joyce penned his classic novel, and despite the increase in European-style cafes and restaurants, the city’s 800 or so pubs are still the hub of social life; a place to meet f...

By in the section Beer Journeys

p54

Beer is continuing to win acceptance at the dining table. Nigel Huddleston reports on how beer is being introduced at the very best

If you’re the sort of person who can afford to dine out in the sorts of restaurants where three courses set you back upwards of £50 a head you no longer have to put up with dreary first growth clarets...

By Nigel Huddleston in the section Beer Trends

p58

Pietra is a chestnut beer from Corsica. Jonathan Gregson went there to taste it

The island of Corsica is known for its rugged beauty and for being the birthplace of Napoleon Bonaparte. In gastronomic terms, its specialities are goats’ cheeses redolent of the maquis and mountain d...

By in the section Spotlight

p60

Our American writer Gary Monterosso offers tips for that big beer day out

As the movement towards flavourful beers has accelerated during the last couple of decades, a number of side industries have grown up, one of them being tasting festivals. Look in any beverage public...

By in the section

p62

It was a tradition as old as pub food but the pie and a pint has been consigned to the historical dustbin. Alastair Gilmour cries in to his beer

When the chief executive of one of the country’s most respected beer institutions talks seriously, it pays to listen. George Philliskirk, chief executive of The Beer Academy, admits that as a student...

By Alastair Gilmour in the section Beer Trends

p64

North in Leeds is a beer mecca. Nigel Huddleston reports

When British Sunday newspaper the Observer named North in Leeds at the Best Place to Drink in the United Kingdom, there was no one more stunned than its manager Christian Townsley. Four months on, To...

By Nigel Huddleston in the section Spotlight

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