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Beers of the World section Regional Focus

Iorwerth Griffiths explains that there's more to Ireland than stout.

Then the words ‘beer’ and ‘Ireland’ are mentioned it is the black stuff – stout – that usually springs to mind and one brand in particular – Guinness. Thankfully, there’s a whole lot more to beer in Ireland than that. Ireland is one of the world’s historic brewing nations and gave the world a disti...

By from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

Prosaic images of England’s north west – rain, flat caps, black pudding, Vimto, hot-pot, meat-and-potato pies – are easy to bring to mind but are evidence of lazy thinking. Exploration of the north west reveals a multifaceted cultural landscape proud of its industrial powerhouse glory years, home to...

By from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

Breweries ADNAMS, Southwold, Suffolk +44 (0)1502 727 200 www.adnams.co.uk CHOICE BEER: Broadside 6.3% BARTRAMS BREWERY, Rougham, Suffolk +44 (0)7790 596 539 www.bartramsbrewery.co.uk CHOICE BEER: Jester Quick One 4.4% GEORGE BATEMAN & SONS, Wainfleet, Lincolnshire +44 (0)1754 880 317 www.bateman.co....

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 17 published on 30/04/2008

There's a lot of very good beer produced between Berwick upon Tweed and Middlesbrough, writes Alastair Gilmour.

The stripes of one of its perpetually-underperforming football clubs are black and white; the geography is hilly and flat; the weather can be hot and cold in the same day – the North East of England is a region of contrasts and extremes. Its 3,317 square miles nurture world leaders in stem-cell res...

By Alastair Gilmour from Issue 16 published on 25/01/2008

Wells & Young's has undergone huge changes in the last two years. But as Dominic Roskrow reports, the parent company has been evolving for decades.

It says masses about the major upheavals that have taken place at the brewery formerly known as Charles Wells that ever since Beers of the World was launched in 2005, we have been trying unsuccessfully to visit the brewery. Meetings have been scheduled, postponed, cancelled and rearranged and email...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Dominic Roskrow gets to grips with the breweries of Hampshire, Surrey, Sussex and Kent.

If you’ve been reading too much about brewery closures and the depressed state of the beer industry in the United Kingdom, then perhaps you should treat yourself to a trip down to the corner of England round London. While the Home Counties have a significant number of casualties and some great name...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Breweries HAMPSHIRE Bowman Ales Ltd, Droxford Tel: +44 (0)1489 878 110 www.bowmanales.com Choice beer: Wallops Wood 4% The Crondall Brewing Co, Crondall Tel: +44 (0)1252 319 000 www.crondallbrewery.co.uk Choice beer: Crondall’s Best 4% The Flowerpots Brewery, Alresford Tel: +44 (0)1962 771 534 Cho...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

In this issue Dominic Roskrow looks at the family brewers of Manchester as well as Lancashire, Cheshire, Greater Manchester and Merseyside

The folk of Manchester understand better than most that if something isn’t broken, you don’t fix it. And being a pretty down to earth bunch they don’t do fancy for fancy’s sake. On the contrary: Manchester does gritty, grainy and genuine better than anyone else. And so it is when it comes to beer. ...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

Jeff Evans discovers the beers and breweries of Wales

Growing up in South Wales in the 1970s, my interests were rock music and beer. Sadly, there was not much to shout about locally on either account. The big bands seldom crossed the Severn Bridge and there was little of indigenous musical note. It was the same with beer. I might have acquired a taste...

By Jeff Evans from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

The South West of England remains a tightly competitive region for beer producers. Now some of them are turning to the internet to push their products forward. Dominic Roskrow reports

Established regional brewers and the latest advances in new technology are reluctant bedfellows, and it remains one of the drink industry’s greatest ironies that while many state of the art microbreweries are rightly acclaimed for beers produced in technologically advanced equipment sited on industr...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

Several regions of Britain could lay claim to be its most fertile beer producer. One of the least celebrated is the East Midlands. Dominic Roskrow grew up there

For most of us that queasy period when we travel from awkward teenager to young adult is fraught with insecurity and fear. Our first metaphorical fumblings with the bra strap of adult life are ungainly, uncouth and uncultured. But the memory plays strange tricks on us as we grow older. Light-headed...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

Dominic Roskrow sees what's brewing in Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hertfordshire, Northamptonshire and Oxfordshire

There are a band of counties in a commuter belt round London that don’t fit in to any discernible regional area. They occupy a no man’s land somewhere between the South West of England, North West London and The Midlands, and they epitomise the suburban towns and rural communities that define middl...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

Scotland has undergone a real ale revolution in recent years. Dominic Roskrow reports

What a difference a decade makes. At least in the story of cask ale it does. In the mid 90s there was more chance of seeing scantily-clad rah-rah girls doing the conga on Scotland’s beaches than finding a good selection of real ale in its bars. My, how times have changed. On one occasion way back...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 9 published on 22/11/2006

Adrian Tierney-Jones discovers the beers of England’s most northerly counties, Cumbria and Northumberland

Cumbria and Northumberland don’t immediately spring to mind when we think about the great beer counties of England. Southern neighbour Yorkshire makes a lot of noise about its best bitters, while the city state of Newcastle gives its allegiance to the eponymous brown ale (even though it’s brewed el...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 8 published on 27/09/2006

England's West Midlands has long been a beer heartland, built on its industrial past. Roger Protz looks at what is on offer these days

Mild ale was once the dominant beer style of England but it declined after World War Two under the twin onslaughts of first bitter and then lager. It has nevertheless retained a substantial following in the region of England centred on Wolverhampton known as the Black Country. It would be tempting ...

By Roger Protz from Issue 7 published on 28/07/2006

Scotland has undergone a beer revolution in the last decade. Ben McFarland looks at what is on offer

When it comes to life-enhancing liquids, Scotland can proudly lay claim to both whisky and water. What few people know, however, is that Scotland is home to some of the United Kingdom’s most exciting and tasty beer. In fact, Scottish beer is fast-becoming the talk of hopheads and ale-aficionados wo...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

Andrew Catchpole looks at the beers and breweries of Greater London, Middlesex and Surrey

London’s best known contribution to the beer world is the treacle dark, burnt-bitter edged, thirst-slaking beauty that is porter. This original London stout was possibly created by one Ralph Harwood of the Bell Brewhouse in Shoreditch in or around 1722 (a plaque still marks the spot). Whatever its ...

By Andrew Catchpole from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

Welsh brewer Brains combines a thoroughly modern approach to its business with the very best of traditions. Glynn Davis reports

It might be about to enter its 125th year as a brewer in the centre of Cardiff but Brains is a thoroughly modern-thinking company with family owners who continue to ensure that their charge has fire in its belly. From its award-winning marketing campaigns, innovative development of beers and inspir...

By Glynn Davis from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

Yorkshire is one of Britain’s finest beer regions. We have extensively covered North Yorkshire in past issues. Here Barrie Pepper goes West and South

The 1974 edition of the Good Beer Guide – the very first which warned you to avoid Watney’s like the plague – lists 10 breweries in South and West Yorkshire. Of these eight have closed. In this year’s guide there are 41, showing a net gain of 39. This remarkable statistic takes no account of a doz...

By from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

Andrew Catchpole looks at the brewers of Hampshire, Sussex and Kent

Evidence of brewing among the pastoral landscapes and rolling downs of South East England stretches back into the Middle Ages and beyond. Even today a visit to Kent and parts of Sussex reveals a very visible reminder of England’s brewing history. The countryside is spiked with old oasthouses and, o...

By Andrew Catchpole from Issue 4 published on 27/01/2006

The North-West of England is still a healthy area for quality beer. Andrew Catchpole picks out the best buys

Howls of protest greeted the closure of Boddington’s historic Strangeways Brewery last year and the later buy-outs of both Jennings and Burtonwood by Wolverhampton and Dudley Breweries further upset aficionados of real ale. However, this spirited region still boasts a formidable roll call of indepe...

By Andrew Catchpole from Issue 3 published on 12/01/2006

The South West of England is associated with cider production but it has a thriving brewery industry too. Adrian Tierney-Jones acts as tour guide

The towns and villages of the southwest all bear traces of the region’s brewing heritage. In Bristol, alongside the Avon, in the centre of the city, a block of bijou flats are all that remains of the brewery where Georges and then Courage made their renowned Boys Bitters. Further south in the seas...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 2 published on 16/11/2005

East Anglia has emerged from the shadow of one large brewer and is producing some of Britain’s most exciting beers. Andrew Burnyeat reports

You could have counted breweries in East Anglia on the fingers of one hand in the 1960s. Dozens of small breweries closed as Watney’s Red Barrel ruled the brewing waves. But since the 1980s there has been a marked revival, and there are now almost 50 breweries in the region, from the regional colos...

By from Issue 1 published on 26/08/2005


 
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