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Beers of the World section Cider Special

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By Sally Toms from Issue 23 published on 27/03/2009

The alarm goes off at 8am on a cold late-October morning, and I’m reminded what a stupid idea this cidermaking is. But up we get, nevertheless, and after breakfast some willing family and friends arrive, and we’re out the door. Arriving at the first orchard, we descend like locusts upon the first ...

By from Issue 23 published on 27/03/2009

It’s a frosty winter’s evening in an apple orchard somewhere in Somerset. A crowd of people are gathered, while a bonfire glows in the dark – suddenly there’s the sharp crack of gunfire as several shotguns blaze into the air above the trees. The brief silence is followed by the sound of singing, whi...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 23 published on 27/03/2009

Cidermaking as we know it today swept into Wales from England sometime around the 14th century. In lowland regions such as Monmouthshire, every farm produced cider for the workforce, and only the mechanisation of agriculture in the 1950s brought an end to this rural tradition. But during the last de...

By from Issue 23 published on 27/03/2009

With a name like Thatcher and a location in the shadow of the Mendip Hills in Somerset, it’s entirely appropriate that one of the top cider-producers in the United Kingdom is proud of its heritage and history. Given this, it’s also heartening to report that it remains a true family business. Managi...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 23 published on 27/03/2009

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By Sally Toms from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

Synonymous with roast beef, Morris dancing and the gentle thwack of a cricket ball on a village green, cider is, for many, a quintessentially English tipple. Lest we forget, however, cider making is currently a Europe-wide phenomenon with France, Spain and Scandinavian countries all prone to a dabb...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

There’s more to cider and food than a Ploughman’s lunch or a leg of pork braised in the stuff. In the Asturias region of Spain, the local sidra is a commonplace companion with the gorgeous cuisine of the area. At a swanky restaurant in the city of Gijon during last year’s international cider exhibi...

By Sally Toms from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

All that British tourists usually saw of the Cotentin peninsula – Normandy’s cheery little thumbs-up in the English Channel – was the N13 trunk road. After a seven-hour crossing, the Cotentin was never more than the first leg of the slog from Cherbourg to the sun. But Brittany Ferries’ Fastcraft c...

By Ted Bruning from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

While cider takes all the glory, spare a thought for its close cousin perry. Pear perry is one of the greatest and yet unsung drinks in the world. The recent success of cider has reflected well on perry, but no sooner has it shaken off its image of Babycham then along comes a host of Swedish, Irish...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

Heavens to Betsy, how did that happen? Just a few years ago, cider had all the lure of an apple with a maggot in it and, then suddenly – bam! Cider is the apple of the United Kingdom drinker’s eye. Its transformation from park bench to swanky bar is perhaps the most remarkable drinks story of the ...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

Ladies and gentlemen, a big hand for the apple – the most important fruit in the world. It inspired Isaac Newton’s laws of gravity; it keeps the doctor away if consumed on a daily basis; it tastes so lovely, not even Adam and Eve could resist its charms; and, most exciting of all, it’s the (ahem) co...

By from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007


 
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