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Beers of the World section Beer Trends

Glynn Davis reveals what no self-respecting beer drinker should be without

One of the greatest things about beer is the infinite styles that are available. But with pubs, bars and stores now stocking increasingly diverse ranges of bottled and draught brews it can be confusing as well as exciting. With this multitude to pick from the big question is what exactly should you...

By Glynn Davis from Issue 17 published on 30/04/2008

Ales and porters finished in oak casks are set to take beer in an exciting new direction. Dominic Roskrow reports

The news that wine had overtaken beer as the most popular drink of choice in Britain will have left many of us crying into our pint pots. But if the grain is at war with the grape then the grain has started the fightback – and it’s turning to its big brother to help it do so. A clear trend towards ...

By Dominic Roskrow from Issue 17 published on 30/04/2008

Some people love it, some people hate it, but what’s the deal with bottle conditioning? Nigel Huddleston reports

It might not seem like much, but when British retailer Marks & Spencer decided to launch four bottleconditioned beers from various small-scale producers around the United Kingdom, it marked a significant step forward for the fortunes of what the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) calls “real ale in a bot...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Would a beer by any other name smell as sweet?

It’s not just wine makers that can come up with evocative or silly names for their products; brewers have been getting in on the act for years. But what’s in a name? Just how do breweries think up the names for their latest brew, from the cheeky (Mother In Laws Tongue Tied), the scary (Skull Splitte...

By from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

Modern craft brewers are brave and getting braver. David Gilbert reports on a new wave of experimental brews from the USA and beyond

he United States was once a country known for industrial lagers with expensive ad campaigns. Cutting edge craft brewers have helped to change this reputation by transforming the US beer scene. This shift in brewing techniques is a radical departure from the more established beer cultures found in c...

By from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

American breweries coined the term ‘extreme’ more than a decade ago. Are British brewers starting to follow suit? Adrian Tierney Jones reports

Extreme beer is the current buzzword on the lips of United States craft brewers, as that country’s dynamic brewing community experiments with woodaging, triple amounts of hops, various combos of fruit and veg in the mash tun and the odd beer with peanut butter in the mix. These beers are the brewing...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

Hotels are waking up and taking beer more seriously. Glynn Davis reports

The recruitment of a chief beer officer (CBO) by the ‘Four Points by Sheraton’ hotel chain not only gave Scott Kerkmans his dream job (out of 7,800 applicants) but also signalled that beer is increasingly being used as a point of difference by hotels. Pete Lesser, senior director of food and bevera...

By Glynn Davis from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

Richard Jones considers if the shape of your glass affects the enjoyment of your beer

If you’re serious about wine, you’d probably need an extension on the side of the house to accommodate your glass collection. Austrian wine maker Riedel was one of the first glassware manufacturers to recognise the profound effect the shape and quality of a glass could have on the aroma, taste and o...

By Richard Jones from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

What is it with all these extra-cold beers popping up everywhere at the moment? And how cold are they, anyway? Nigel Huddleston reports

American readers who’ve visited the United Kingdom recently might have noticed something odd about the way Brits are taking their drinks these days. A gin and tonic will often come in a tall glass crammed with chunks of ice, while convenience stores have banks of chillers displaying ice cold cans o...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

Gastropubs have the reputation for prioritising food above beer, but is that necessarily true? Ted Bruning reports

Heston Blumenthal’s got one, and so has Jean-Christophe Novelli, although he wants nine more. Gordon Ramsay’s got two. And Anthony Worrall-Thompson has just got his third. So it seems that buying pubs is all the rage for television’s top toques these days. But is it a good thing? We’ve lived for so...

By Ted Bruning from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

Beer as a cocktail ingredient might not sound very appealing, but anyone who has tried a Shandy or a Black Velvet has had one. Nigel Huddleston reports

As if beer wasn’t brilliant enough already, increasing numbers of bars in the United States are using beer as a cocktail ingredient. If you’re feeling a bit adventurous you can have a Skip & Go Naked, which turns out not to be a bar room game but a mix of lager, lemon juice and gin, with a dash of ...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

Americans have a reputation for doing everything bigger and better, and its breweries are no exception. But is bigger necessarily better when beer is concerned? David Gilbert reports

In the early 1980s the aspiration of many American brewers was to create beers that mirrored the classic European styles. As the craft brew movement grew and evolved, American brewers began to experiment and deviate from these traditional styles. If we fast-forward 20 years, American breweries hav...

By from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

Tim Hampson lets the train take the strain as he explores the age-old romance between
beer and steam power

I love pubs like the Cornmill – modern, lively, sassy and with a story to tell. If location itself made a perfect pub then the Cornmill, Llangollen in North Wales would be one of the best in the world. A former 18th century corn mill, which had fallen on hard times, it has been recently converted i...

By from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

Britain’s independent family brewers are under increasing amounts of pressure, but many of them are doing better than ever. Glynn Davis reports

'Yet another casualty as family sells’, ‘Is the end near for Britain’s independent breweries?’ and ‘Trouble’s brewing – but independent beer makers fight on’ are among a host of recent headlines that have highlighted just how difficult it is for brewers to remain independent. Among the independents...

By Glynn Davis from Issue 9 published on 22/11/2006

In recent years there has been a surge of mid-strength beers, occupying the space somewhere between low
alcohol and regular strength pints. But are they any good? Nigel Huddleston reports

What’s green and promises not to get you too drunk? Were the question from the British tradition of rubbish not funny jokes the answer might be something like “a frog that’s left its wallet at home,” but actually it’s a bottle of Beck’s Green Lemon. Unless you’ve been to Germany in the last year a...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 9 published on 22/11/2006

Some of England's regional brewers are establishing brewery outposts far from home. Glynn Davis reports

It’s not exactly surprising that breweries look to open pubs that are relatively close to their brewing operations. This makes delivering their carefully crafted beers a simple exercise and simplifies the issue of visiting the boozers to keep an eye on operations. There’s also the issue of managemen...

By Glynn Davis from Issue 8 published on 27/09/2006

Beer is continuing to win acceptance at the dining table. Nigel Huddleston reports on how beer is being introduced at the very best

If you’re the sort of person who can afford to dine out in the sorts of restaurants where three courses set you back upwards of £50 a head you no longer have to put up with dreary first growth clarets or grands cru Burgundy to go with it. Beer has gatecrashed the fine dining party, with Michelin-st...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 7 published on 28/07/2006

It was a tradition as old as pub food but the pie and a pint has been consigned to the historical dustbin. Alastair Gilmour cries in to his beer

When the chief executive of one of the country’s most respected beer institutions talks seriously, it pays to listen. George Philliskirk, chief executive of The Beer Academy, admits that as a student at Newcastle University, he would often call into the city’s Hotspur pub for a lunchtime pie and a ...

By Alastair Gilmour from Issue 7 published on 28/07/2006

How do you make sense of the United States and all its breweries? Gary Monterosso picks 10 favourite beers

With more than 1,300 breweries operating in the United States today, it is astounding to realise that there were only 40 in existence 30 years ago. Then, most of those breweries were large and generally made light lagers. Thanks to the infusion of microbreweries and brewpubs, there are thousands of...

By from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

Vaux Double Maxim enjoys iconic status. And according to Alastair Gilmour it’s going from strength to strength

One of the country’s most historic beers not only continues to perform well, but its ‘big brother’ is sharing its takehome spotlight. For more than a century, Vaux Double Maxim has been one of the North East of England’s best-loved beers, with such a following that when the brewing operation ceased...

By Alastair Gilmour from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

American icon Garret Oliver has written arguably the definitive book on food and beer matching. Zak Avery met him and tasted some of his pairings

Garrett Oliver is an iconic figure within the brewing world. As brewmaster of the Brooklyn brewery, and the author of the definitive book on beer and food matching (The Brewmaster’s Table), there’s not a lot that he doesn’t know about the gastronomy of beer. He’s also an affable, gregarious host, an...

By from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

France isn’t known for its beers, but in the North of the country they produce some excellent ones. Adrian Tierney-Jones went in search of them

Even though the French make a lot of noise about their wine, it’s Jean Barleycorn and beer that wears the culottes in the northern part of the country. From the Channel coast to its eastern border with southern Wallonia and the southernmost tip of the Ardennes, this is beer country, known for the B...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

Will beers stored in casks previously used to mature another drink become increasingly popular, or is it just a fad? Adrian Tierney Jones reports

In the summer of 2003, former Caledonian Brewery head brewer Dougal Sharp unveiled Innis & Gunn’s Woodaged Beer. This was a stunningly flavoured 6.6% beer that had spent the first 37 days of its post-fermentation existence slumbering away in American white oak barrels. After that, all the beer in t...

By from Issue 4 published on 27/01/2006

Freedom was once the beer of choice for Soho trendies. Now a successful television script writer has relaunched it. Ben McFarland reports

If you were an uber-fashionable Soho soand- so in the mid 1990s, there was only one beer to be seen drinking and that was Freedom. The Freedom Brewing Company was set up in 1995 by a number of entrepreneurs including, among others, Alastair Hook of Meantime fame. It was a stark antithesis to the bi...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 2 published on 16/11/2005

Cobra has turned the reputation of Indian beer upside down – but it’s taken the strangest route to do so. Nigel Huddleston reports

The year is 1989 and as a junior reporter on a British drinks trade paper I’m dispatched to talk to a bloke who’s about to launch a new bottled lager in the United Kingdom. The country’s in the grip of Sol fever – complete with wedge of lime stuffed in the top of the bottle – and hundreds of one-ma...

By Nigel Huddleston from Issue 2 published on 16/11/2005

Corsica’s an unlikely place to find a beer boom, so why’s it happening? Andrew Burnyeat accepts an offer he can’t refuse

Ten years ago on the beautiful Mediterranean island of Corsica, beer wasn’t really part of the hospitality picture. Today, beer is sold in nearly every restaurant; chefs cook with it and islanders regard themselves as discerning beer drinkers. Why? Simple really. Corsicans are a loyal and proud p...

By from Issue 2 published on 16/11/2005

As Britain prepares to mark the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar and the death of its greatest naval hero, Mark Nicholls looks at how brewers will salute Lord Nelson in his bicentenary year

There have been many glasses raised in honour of Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson, without doubt the greatest of all British naval heroes. But this year, the 200th anniversary of his death at the Battle of Trafalgar on October 21, 1805, many of those toasts will be drunk with specially-brewed ale. A he...

By from Issue 1 published on 26/08/2005

The phrase 'continental culture' is becoming commonplace. Is there a continental style, or do Europeans all approach beer in different ways? Andrew Burnyeat reports

London Lord Mayor Ken Livingstone would love it. If he were French, closing time would be a matter for him. When he’s finished his drink, that’s it, everybody goes home. (Not really – but the Mayor does have a big say over late licence extensions and when nightclubs can close.) Bars generally close...

By from Issue 1 published on 26/08/2005


 
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