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Beers of the World section Beer Journeys

John Westlake embarks on a beer journey in Belgrade.

Wandering around the bustling centre of Belgrade, Serbia’s capital city and this year’s host to the Eurovision Song Contest, it is difficult to believe that less than a decade ago the Royal Air Force, as part of NATO, were dropping smart bombs on nearby strategic targets. In a few places, the twiste...

By from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

Jeff Evans climbs aboard the Kusttram for a beer journey along the beautiful Belgian coast.

With a bump and a squeal, the tram rattles its way along the Belgian coast. The journey is nippy and fun, sometimes as smooth as velvet, at other times as jerky as a fairground ride, as we scuttle past busy marinas, golden beaches and rolling sand dunes. With plenty of stops at regular intervals, it...

By Jeff Evans from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

Matt Kirkegaard embarks on a Sideways-style beer romp in Western Australia, an area more commly associated with wines.

GO WEST YOUNG MAN Oddly enough for a nation with a permanent place in the top five beer drinking countries, Australians are just starting to discover beer. It’s true that beer is a backdrop to our social gatherings and it is integral to our national obsession with sport, but for all that we drink i...

By from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

Daniel Neilson goes in search of rural England and some splendid ales on the south coast.

You may imagine the South Downs Way is all about blisters, stinging nettles and traipsing through amusingly named villages (Cocking, Winding Bottom) and, well, it is. But it also offers great opportunity to sample a range of local brews across the south coast while resting weary legs in historical ...

By from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

Adrian Tierney-Jones takes a beer lover's tour of Milan, a great base to explore Italy's burgeoning beer scene.

If you want to make believe that you’ve never left the United Kingdom then Milan’s fake Brit-pub the Cambridge is the sort of place that you’ll feel right at home. Standing on the Piazzale Susa, to the east of the centre, this is a mocked-up version of what those who have never ventured beyond Londo...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 17 published on 30/04/2008

Intrepid beer hunter Zak Avery explores the city so good they named it twice.

It is said that no-one really comes from New York; it’s a city built on a perpetual influx of people who simply don’t want to be anywhere else, or have nowhere else to go. This cliché of the melting pot has created a semi-mythical city that can satisfy any desire – culinary, cultural or otherwise – ...

By from Issue 16 published on 25/01/2008

Canada is a major player in the beer revolution that is sweeping North America. Robert Hughey seeks out the beer venues in its largest city.

Toronto, Canada’s largest city with a population just under five million, was once known as ‘Toronto the Good’ because it was a bastion of Victorian morals. Reviving the line with a slight revision might nudge closer to the truth of today: Toronto, the Good Beer Place. Quite a relief, really, after ...

By from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Charles D Cook discovers the beers and bars of the Belgian capital

Brussels: the capital of Belgium and also of the European Union, the city is home to many a fine restaurant, museum, and historic site. More importantly, however, from the standpoint of beer lovers like you and I, are the excellent beer cafés, breweries and beery restaurants which inhabit the city. ...

By from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

Ben McFarland visits the beer hot spots of sunny San Diego

America’s backlash against bland beer began on the West Coast. San Francisco, always keen to stick it to the man, got the ball rolling in the 70s. Then the defiant, drizzly duo of Portland and Seattle, picked it up, ran with it and kept scampering along like some kind of crazed, craft beer-drinking ...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

Ted Bruning picks out a few pubs in the Borough

Great place for pubs, London. Not so great for beer, though. But before sundry London brewers (sorry, Mr Keeling) get apoplexy, let’s qualify that. Yes, London has Fuller’s. It used to have Young’s, too, although that belongs to Bedford now. And lots of other regional brewers also maintain a presen...

By Ted Bruning from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

City breaks for the beer enthusiast have never been easier, and you couldn’t do better than Prague. But
where’s the best place to find a good beer? Lubomír Sedlák reports

Neither of the two biggest and most famous Czech breweries Plzensky Prazdroj (part of SABMiller) and Budejovicky Budvar (still state-owned) is located in Prague. The first, as most Beers of the World readers probably know, can be found in the west Bohemian city of Plzen (better known abroad under it...

By from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

Adrian Tierney-Jones scouts out the best beers and the best bars in the French capital

At the start of the 1990s I was a guest in the house of a well-known French writer, an octogenarian intellectual who reputedly drank two bottles of wine a day. Neither of us could speak each other’s language so communication was a bit limited. However, when I asked for a beer his response was perfe...

By Adrian Tierney-Jones from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

There's more to this Californian city than meets the eye. Jeff Pickthall reports on a thriving beer culture

It is easy to make a list of things for which San Francisco is famous: steep hills; the Golden Gate Bridge; Dirty Harry; Haight Ashbury and the Summer of Love; the earthquake and fire; the Castro, gays and Harvey Milk; Pacific Fleet; the Gold Rush; Bullitt; Alcatraz; fog; sour dough bread; cable car...

By from Issue 9 published on 22/11/2006

Jack Curtin spends a day discovering the beers and bars of this Pennsylvania city

Sitting at the Standard Tap in Philadelphia on a Sunday morning, happily sipping a pint in an establishment which serves only local beers, and only on draught, it is easy to understand how this city can lay claim to being one of the best beer cities in America. In fact, the respected Celebrator Bee...

By from Issue 8 published on 27/09/2006

Dublin is established as a beer drinkers' paradise. But now the money's rolling in and the city's being transformed, where can you still get a decent pint? Andrew Marshall reports

Little has changed since Joyce penned his classic novel, and despite the increase in European-style cafes and restaurants, the city’s 800 or so pubs are still the hub of social life; a place to meet friends, to laugh, relax and enjoy a pint. Dubliners sum it all up in one word – craic. In Ulysses, ...

By from Issue 7 published on 28/07/2006

Manchester might have lost its 'cream' in the form of Boddingtons Brewery, but the self styled 'Capital of the North' remains a prime destination for beer lovers writes Richard Jones.

It may not quite inspire the ‘love it, hate it’ extremes of Marmite or Laphroaig Single Malt Whisky, but Manchester is a city that arouses mixed emotions. Supporters argue that only London competes with it for the title of the most happening conurbation in the United Kingdom, a lively cosmopolitan ...

By Richard Jones from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

For any beer aficionado, a visit to Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark is a must. Andrew Marshall reports

Don’t forget your ticket for some complimentary beers,” says the attendant inside the world-famous Carlsberg Brewery as I begin my introduction into the beer and bar culture of Copenhagen, Scandinavia’s liveliest and most cosmopolitan city. The Carlsberg Visitor’s Centre offers a free selfguided to...

By from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

Yorkshires unofficial capital city is the place for historic pubs, great nightlife and world class beer. Richard Jones went for a stroll

It may be home to hundreds of thousands of their ilk, but Leeds refuses to conform to clichés about Yorkshiremen. Whereas 20 or 30 years ago you might have found its streets (cobbled, inevitably) filled with flat-cap-wearing, ‘chip on both shoulders’, pennypinching characters so memorably lampooned...

By Richard Jones from Issue 4 published on 27/01/2006

Alastair Gilmour takes his place in one of the most unusual pub visits he has ever undertaken

Who could turn down the invitation to a pub crawl, a bit of banter and a good time? It’s a suggestion loaded with possibilities which the Edinburgh Literary Pub Tour delivers in entertaining fashion – a witty and dramatic romp led by professional actors through the life and work of Scotland’s great...

By Alastair Gilmour from Issue 4 published on 27/01/2006

Relaxing with a few beers – oh, and maybe a chicken – is part of the Bavarian way of life for men and women, young and old. Andrew Burnyeat reports

Imagine a public park filled with row upon row of tables and benches. Now imagine those benches heaving under the weight of the collective backside of the local populace. The weather is bright and sunny, everyone has a two-litre jug of beer and is chatting quietly to the people around them. Away fr...

By from Issue 3 published on 12/01/2006

Ben McFarland hits the road in rural Belgium in search of the perfect pint

When a French-speaking Belgian pours himself a beer, chances are it’s brewed in Wallonia. Earthy, rustic and full of character, Walloon beers truly embody their refreshingly rural and unheard of homeland which occupies the southern half of Belgium. Wallonia has lived long in the shadow of Flanders...

By Ben McFarland from Issue 2 published on 16/11/2005


 
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