Welcome back () Wednesday 21st January 2009 - 4:16 AM GMT

Beers of the World author Roger Protz

Roger Protz turns his attention to Achel brewery and the ‘famous five’ Belgian Trappist breweries

When German troops occupied the monastery of Achel during World War One they observed the conventions of military conflict. As the monastery straddles the border between Belgium and the Netherlands, the Germans seized only the Belgian side, as the Netherlands was neutral. Decency stopped there: the ...

Brewery Focus from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

In the latest in our series on beer styles, Roger Protz reveals all about golden ale.

The original aim of brewers both in Britain and abroad who make golden ales was a simple and, at the time, desperate one: to attempt to counter the rise of global lager brands. Small brewers, of regional and micro size, did not have the reserves available to invest in lager equipment, so they opted...

Beer styles from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

1.CROUCH VALE BREWERS GOLD (4%) A fascinating beer that is an ale with close lager connotations as it’s brewed using lager malt and a German hop variety, Brewers Gold. It comes from the portfolio of one of Britain’s longest-running micros formed more than 20 years ago. Brewers Gold won the Best Bit...

Beer styles from Issue 19 published on 30/07/2008

In the latest of our series on traditional beer styles, Roger Protz looks to porter and stout.

Beer is a convivial drink, yet sit a group of beer writers down to discuss the origins of porter and the fur will soon start to fly. There are many arguments for how the beer style acquired its name, some of them fanciful, such as it being a corruption of either export or the Latin portare. Contemp...

Beer styles from Issue 18 published on 19/06/2008

This issue, Roger Protz looks at old ale and barley wine

Old ale and barley wine are often linked but they are not one and the same, they are two quite distinct and separate styles. Barley wine, as the name suggests, is strong in alcohol and historically was brewed as a rival to imported French wine. Old ale, on the other hand, can have a modest strengt...

Beer styles from Issue 17 published on 30/04/2008

Traditional coopers are slowly becoming a thing of the past. Roger Protz looks at the role of the cask in beer making today.

onathan Manby is the final chip off the old block. He is a journeyman cooper at Theakston’s brewery in Yorkshire, the last man to serve his apprenticeship and fashion wooden beer casks. The ancient skill of turning staves of timber into beer casks held together by hoops is likely to disappear some t...

from Issue 16 published on 25/01/2008

Roger Protz gets to the bottom of extra special bitter, or ESB for short.

One beer can define a style. In the mid-19th century, a golden lager beer from Pilsen not only revolutionised brewing on a world scale but gave its name to a style: pilsner or pils for short. In Britain, a strong ale called Extra Special Bitter, brewed by Fuller’s in west London, spawned a style wit...

Beer styles from Issue 16 published on 25/01/2008

1.ARKELL’S KINGSDOWN ALE (5.2% Arkell’s, founded in 1843, is a sturdy independent, family-owned brewery in Swindon whose success in the 19th century was fuelled by the town becoming an important hub of the new railway system. Brewing takes place in traditional wood-jacketed mash tuns, coppers and op...

Beer styles from Issue 16 published on 25/01/2008

In the latest of our series on beer styles, Roger Protz turns his attention to best bitter.

It is a common mistake to think that ‘best bitter’ is just bitter with hair on its chest. While it is true that some versions of ‘best’ are stronger versions of their weaker brethren, many brewers take the opportunity, when fashioning a higher gravity beer, to blend different varieties of malt and h...

Beer styles from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Six of the best

1. ADNAMS BROADSIDE SOUTHWOLD, SUFFOLK, 4.7% This Suffolk best bitter commemorates the Battle of Sole Bay off Southwold in 1672 when the unlikely combination of the English and French fleets defeated the Dutch. Men o’ War fighting ships in those days placed all their guns along one deck and fired t...

Beer styles from Issue 15 published on 01/12/2007

Roger Protz goes behind the scenes at the gigantic Heineken brewery in Amsterdam

Small country, big beer. Heineken is a beer colossus, the world’s fourth biggest producer and, the company claims, the most profitable. This success has been built by breaking out of the straight jacket of the Dutch market, with a population of just 14 million, and going global. The figures spelt o...

International Focus from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

In the latest of our series on beer styles, Roger Protz takles the ubiquitous pint of bitter

Ask anyone from abroad with a passing interest in beer to name England’s most famous style and the answer is likely to be “bitter.” While British connoisseurs revel in such famous styles as India pale ale, porter and stout, there’s no doubt it is bitter that most clearly defines our beer culture. W...

Beer styles from Issue 14 published on 04/10/2007

The Bavarian town of Bamberg is packed full of breweries to delight the beer adventurer. Roger Protz went for a look-see

If you are searching for beer paradise, there’s no need to wait until you fall off your bar stool – just head for Bamberg. This small city of 70,000 people in Franconia, upper Bavaria, has 11 breweries and a vast collection of inns and taverns in which to enjoy their brews. The beers include fascin...

from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

In the latest of our series on beer styles, Roger Protz discovers the origins of pale ale

It’s called pale ale but it’s not a pallid beer. Brewed properly, with careful attention to style, it should be a robust beer, with a powerful punch of hop bitterness balancing juicy malt and the tart and tangy fruit flavours associated with Britain’s warmfermented ales. Let us begin by stating wha...

Beer styles from Issue 13 published on 03/08/2007

In the latest of our series on beer styles, Roger Protz looks at the history of brown and mild

When I first started drinking in London pubs some 40 years ago I would call for “a pint of brown and mild.” Why? For the simple reason that my father and people of his age group all drank the same tipple and in those days we followed in the wise footsteps of our elders and betters. But with the be...

Beer styles from Issue 12 published on 25/05/2007

Following the recent discovery of some rare, aged beers at the former Bass brewery in Burton upon Trent,
Roger Protz went along to see how they’d aged

Those of us that chip away at the coalface labelled ‘beer’ constantly stress that our preferred form of alcohol deserves as much attention and respect as wine. The juice of the barley can be as complex and profound as the juice of the grape. But just as some wines improve with age so also do some f...

Spotlight from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

In the latest of our series on beer styles, Roger Protz gets to grips with pilsner

When the disgruntled drinkers of Pilsen in Bohemia dumped a batch of sour beer down the city’s drains in 1840 they set in motion events that were to transform brewing even more resolutely than the brewers of Burton upon Trent had done some years earlier with India pale ale. The local Pilsen brewery...

Beer styles from Issue 11 published on 23/03/2007

Belgium produces the most varied collection of beers in the world; Roger Protz reveals what the beer lover will find there

Belgium is the cornucopia of the beer world. It froths and foams with a vast and diverse offering of the fruits of barley and wheat. A small country rent by political and linguistic antagonisms, united by its passion for beer. This passion is not confined to connoisseurs and brewers. It spills over...

International Focus from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

In the first of a new series, Roger Protz looks at the history of India Pale Ale

Is it fanciful to describe a beer style as “revolutionary”? In the case of India Pale Ale, which transformed brewing on a world scale and paved the way for golden pilsners, the answer must be an emphatic yes. Until the advent of IPA, all beers, even the first lager beers, were dark brown in colour...

Beer Styles from Issue 10 published on 26/01/2007

Yeast is a vital and complex part of beer production. Roger Protz looks at the history of this ingredient and how brewers keep it happy

What are the essential ingredients used in the production of beer? Barley malt, of course, and other grains and special sugars that combine to make a sweet extract known as wort. Then hops, the salt and pepper of the process, add piny, resiny, spicy and fruit aromas and flavours. And there is wate...

from Issue 9 published on 22/11/2006

The Belgian town of Beersel is blessed with not one but two traditional lambic breweries. Roger Protz visited them

It’s a long, steep clamber up from the railway station at Beersel to the small town with its moated castle, built early in the 14th century by the Duke of Brabant to aid the defence of Brussels. When you reach the centre of Beersel you can refresh yourself with beers that form a style – lambic and g...

from Issue 8 published on 27/09/2006

England's West Midlands has long been a beer heartland, built on its industrial past. Roger Protz looks at what is on offer these days

Mild ale was once the dominant beer style of England but it declined after World War Two under the twin onslaughts of first bitter and then lager. It has nevertheless retained a substantial following in the region of England centred on Wolverhampton known as the Black Country. It would be tempting ...

Regional Focus from Issue 7 published on 28/07/2006

Sharp's is challenging St Austell as Cornwall's biggest brewer. Roger Protz visited it

My wife and sons are all too familiar with the following episode during our annual summer holiday. It begins with my saying: “On the way to the beach, can we make a small detour to look at a new microbrewery that’s just opened?” It continues, some three hours later, with the sun gone and rain fallin...

Brewery Focus from Issue 6 published on 18/05/2006

Dutch Trappist brewery Koningshoeven has been accepted back in to the Trappist fold after a long-standing ‘excommunication.’ Roger Protz found out what happened

Healing a family rift is hard at the best of times, but it’s devilish difficult when the family in question is the brotherhood of Trappist monks. Trappists – if you’ll pardon the pun – tend to keep their traps shut and meetings that involved the seven monastic breweries in Belgium and the Netherlan...

from Issue 5 published on 24/03/2006

An international alliance is creating a world class wheat beer in the Ukraine. Roger Protz visited the brewery that is making waves across the globe

The Ukraine has gone from orange to white in a year. First, the Orange Revolution swept the old regime from power and ushered in a pro-Western government. Now a privatised brewing industry is widening choice for drinkers and the most surprising development is locally brewed German-style ‘white’ or ...

from Issue 4 published on 27/01/2006


 
Home | Subscribe | Magazine | Brands | Directory | Store | Forum | Links | Contact | Sitemap
Published by Paragraph Publishing Ltd © 2005
Beers of the World | Whisky Magazine | Whisky Live | Scotland Magazine | World Whiskies Conference